Day Seven Notes and Quotes, World Wrestling Championships

T.R. Foley
FILA News Bureau

Korea Dominates Last Day

Though they came up short in the team scoring the Korean Greco-Roman team made a statement on Sunday in Budapest, earning two gold medals in head-to-head matchups at 66kg and 74kg. Korea’s Ryu Han-Su(66kg) and Kim Hyeon-Woo(74kg) each wrestle Olympic Champions in their title bouts and came away victorious.

Facing a finals opponent is never easy, but for Korea’s Ryu Han-Su the task was even more difficult. The young Korean wrestler was tasked with facing 2008 Olympic Champion Islambeka Albiev, a heavy-favorite coming into the finals.

The back-and-forth match saw Ryu pushing the pace on Albiev for much of the first period, with the duo eventually exchanging par-terre position. However, late int eh second periods, with the score 5-3 in favor of Ryu, Albiev was unable to take the correct starting position from top in par-terre and was disqualified.

“I am extremely happy,” said Ryu. “My enthusiasm lasted until the last second of the match, but I think that I won it on my mentality.

Ryu ended the match with a Gangnam Style dance on the mat with his coach, a move that inspired several in the crowd to join in the fun.

In an unexpected twist 2012 Olympic Champion Kim (66kg) faced 2012 Olympic Champion Roman Vlasov (74kg) in the finals at 74kg. Kim used constant pressure throughout the match to force Vaslov to pushback from the edge. While the Russian did well to avoid danger for the first four minutes, a late slip on the edge cost him the takedown and eventually the match.

“I am happy because I was able to beat an Olympic and European champion,” said Kim. “Now I have the gold medal! Next year I would like to win Asian Games and then I will concentrate on Rio.

Russia Wins Team Title

Though they dropped both their finals matches on Sunday, Team Russia had done enough over the previous two days of Greco competition to secure the team title by six points.  The Russians won one gold (96kg) and three silver (60kg, 66kg, 74kg) on way to their team title.

Korea earned two gold medals (66kg, 74kg), a silver (55kg) and a bronze (60kg) on the weekend.

Host Hungary turned in their best team performance since winning the title in 2005 – the last time the World Championships were held in Budapest.

Final Team Scores
Russia 43
Korea 37
Hungry 31
Iran 29
Armenia 28

India’s Continues Growth

India’s Tulsi Yadan Sandeep made history on Sunday night becoming the first wrestler from India to earn a world medal in Greco-Roman wreslting.

“I am extremely happy,” said Sandeep. “It was a difficult match … I think I have been wrestling to the required technical and physical level which is why I managed to win the bronze.”

Sandeep is the latest example of an Indian wrestling program that has been steadily increasing it’s medal count at Cadet, Junior and Senior level wrestling events. In 2010 Sushil Kumar became India’s first-ever World Champion. He’s also the country’s first-ever Olympic medalist, earning bronze in Beijing at 66kg and a silver in London.

More than 13k Fans Watch Sunday’s Finals

Sunday night’s finals drew more than 13,000 viewers on FILA’s LiveStream. The presentation averaged more than 4k viewers per mat at all time during the seven day event, with finals receiving a higher concentration of the viewership.

Iranian Aliakbari Avenges Loss, Wins Second Title

Amir Aziz Aliakbari helped Iran to a fourth place team finish on Sunday, earning the World Championship at 120kg. Facing 2012 Olympic silver medalist Heiki Nabi of Estonia, Aliakbari was barely challenged, finding four points in the first period, which proved enough to secure the win.

A 2010 World Champion at 96kg, Aliakbari recently completed a two-year probation for doping. After the decision he chose to seek citizenship in Azerbaijan but changed his mind after Iranian fans asked for him to return. Aliakbari had a tough road to eh finals, needing to avenge a University Nationals loss to Riza Kayaalp (TUR) 4-1 in the semifinals, to earn his chance for a second world title.

“A dream of mine has come true with this gold medal,” said Aliakbari. “This is the result of two years of hard work . Now I want to become Asia Champion in 2014 and Olympic Champion in 2016.

Fifteen Countries Earn Medals

Fifteen countries earned medals in Greco-Roman wrestling over the three days of the competition. Russia (4), Korea (4), Hungary (3), Armenia (3), Iran (2), Azerbaijan (2), Turkey (2), while Kazakhstan, Germany, Bulgaria, PR Korea, Uzbekistan, Estonia, Belarus and India all earned one medal.

USA Doesn’t Make it Into Medal Round Saturday

Jesse Thielke, Caylor Williams and Jordan Holm were eliminated when their opponents who defeated then were unable to continue to win.  Controversial calls abounded throughout the day, most notably when Williams was disqualified after a third caution after being head butted throughout his match.

Coleman, inserted for the medically disabled Lester, Bisek and Smith weighed in and received their draws to start off the final day of competition.

 

Burroughs Perfect – Lampe Bronze

Jordan Burroughs maintained his perfect senior winning record, knocking off all of his opponents in grabbing the gold in dominant fashion here at the 2013 World Wrestling Championships in Budapest last evening. Burroughs is now 65-0 on the senior international circuit.

Photo – Mark Lundy

Alyssa Lampe fought her way back thru repêchage to earn a bronze.

Photo – Mark Lundy

 

 

Japanese Loaded in Women’s FS at Wrestling World Championships

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY (September 18) – One year ago, Japanese wrestlers left the London 2012 Olympic Games with three gold medals, while Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) grabbed the fourth.

Kaori ICHO (JPN) and Saori YOSHIDA (JPN) each won their third Olympic Games gold medals and Hitomi OBARA SAKAMOTO (JPN) won her first, underlining Japan’s dominance in women’s freestyle over the last quarter century.

And the country’s on a roll after winning the IOC vote Sept. 6 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, setting the stage for the Japanese women’s continued success on the world scene in Hungary.

This year, Japan comes to Budapest with a promising young squad that, even with the continuing improvement of women’s freestyle worldwide, is likely to leave Papp Laszlo Budapest Sports Arena with multiple gold medals.

Leading the charge for Japan, as they have since 2002, will be YOSHIDA and ICHO at 55kg and 63kg, respectively. The Japanese duo wrestle on the second day of women’s events, September 19, with ICHO going for her 8th world championship belt and YOSHIDA her 11th.

The first day of women’s events, September 18, could be all North American with Alyssa LAMPE (USA) and defending champion Jessica MacDONALD (CAN) the favorites at 48kg and 51kg.  World silver medalist Eri TOSAKA (JPN) and junior world champ Yu MIYAHARA (JPN) will be among the challengers.

Even with YOSHIDA and ICHO on the mats on the second day, most eyes in the arena will be on Marianna SASTIN (HUN) as she tries to become Hungary’s first world champion in women’s wrestling.  Archrival Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE) will likely have a say in whether the hometown favorite is successful or not.

The final day of women’s events, shared with Greco-Roman wrestling, will feature Olympic champion Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) at 72kg and her best friend, the fireman’s carry.

Meanwhile, 67kg could be the most unpredictable category of the championships with two-time junior world champ Dorothy YEATS (CAN) among the favorites and Sara DOSHO (JPN) hoping to become the first and only Japanese woman to win a world title at 67kg.

For fans of statistics, Japan crowned four champions the last time the world championships were held in Budapest in 2005.  A year later in Guangzhou, Japan had five champions, six finalists, and a medal for each of the seven weight categories.

Japan’s largest gold medal haul was in 1994 when, led by Hall of Fame wrestlers Shoko YOSHIMURA (JPN) and Yayoi URANO (JPN), Japan won six of the nine weight categories.

The only time that Japan has gone home without a world champion is from the first women’s world championships in 1987.  And, the Japanese have been held to only one world champion twice – in 1997 and last year in Strathcona County.

Brief sketches of the individual weight categories:

48kg – Alyssa LAMPE (USA), a bronze medalist at 51kg last year, took control of the lightest senior weight category with a triumph over Elena VOSTRIKOVA (RUS) at the Grand Prix of Spain in July.  She followed up a month later with an equally convincing performance at the Poland Open.

Eri TOSAKA (JPN), the world silver medalist one year ago, stormed through the field at the Universiade, beginning with a technical fall over European champion Valeria CHEPSARAKOVA (RUS) and finishing with another tech over European junior champion Patimat BAGOMEDOVA (AZE).

Tatyana AMANZHOL-BAKATYUK (KAZ) was top-ranked at 51kg for June and July, but has recently dropped to 48kg.  The Asia champion’s unorthodox style could cause problems at 48kg or 51kg, wherever she decides to go.

51kg – Yu MIYAHARA (JPN) seeks to become the first Japanese to win a senior world title at 51kg since 2008 when Hitomi SAKAMOTO won in Tokyo. MIYAHARA has won a 2010 Youth Olympic Games gold medal, a cadet world title in 2011 and the junior world crown last month in Sofia.

Defending champion Jessica MacDONALD (CAN) saddled MIYAHARA with her only loss outside of Japan this year at the World Cup in March. More recently, however, MacDONALD lost to European champion Roksana ZASINA (POL).

Also keep an eye on former Asia champion SUN Yanan (CHN), a silver medalist to MacDONALD in 2012, seeking to make the final step up on the medals podium.

55kg – Saori YOSHIDA is wrestling for the record books now – seeking her 11th straight world title and, down the road, perhaps a fourth Olympic Games gold medal.  YOSHIDA has a streak of 168 wins in a row in tournament competition, with her only two losses internationally coming at World Cup meets.

Sofia MATTSSON (SWE), the 2009 world champion at 51kg, has won five tournament titles this year, including the European crown.  Valeria KOBLOVA-ZHOLOBOVA (RUS) has shown she has the style to defeat YOSHIDA, with a win in last year’s World Cup. Helen MAROULIS (USA), 2012 world runner-up, defeated some of the top challengers in Kiev in February, but lost to MATTSSON in July.

59kg – In 2005, Marianna SASTIN (HUN) had the Budapest crowd on its feet as Hungary’s first woman in a world championship final.  This year, the two-time world silver medalist will seek to become the host country’s first-ever female world champion.

Olympic bronze medalist and 2009 world champion Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE) will likely be SASTIN’s biggest obstacle, even though SASTIN defeated her archrival at the Poland Open. Braxton STONE.

(CAN) won two senior titles this summer and Petra OLLI (FIN) won the prestigious Klippan Open crown.

63kg – Kaori ICHO (JPN) has seven world titles to go with her three Olympic Games gold medals and has only one loss in the last decade – a forfeit for medical reasons to HOU Min-wen (TPE) in the first round of the 2007 Asian championships. Except for that forfeit, ICHO has notched 156 wins in a row since the 2003 Klippan Open.

Reigning world champion Elena PIROZHKOVA (USA) is the first non-Japanese wrestler to win at 63kg since the current system of weights was installed in 2002.  Along with PIROZHKOVA, three former world champions – Battsetseg SORONZOBOLD (MGL, 59kg), Ganna VASILENKO (UKR, 59kg) and XILUO ZHUOMA (CHN, 67kg) – will also be on the prowl to upend ICHO.

67kg – Nasanburmaa OCHIRBAT (MGL) has led the rankings all summer with wins at Ivan Yarygin in January and the Asian championships in April.  But, the wrestler to watch here might be two-time junior world champion Dorothy YEATS (CAN), who was also silver medalist at the 2012 senior worlds.

Former junior world champ Sara DOSHO (JPN), getting her first chance at the seniors, held on for a 4-3 win over OCHIRBAT in the Universaide finals, but has suffered a one-sided loss to YEATS, 2-0 (7-1, 6-3), in the semifinals of last year’s junior world meet.

On the human interest side, European champion Alina STADNIK-MAKHINYA (UKR) is the newest member of the wrestling Stadnik family that includes Beijing 2008 silver medalist Andrey STADNIK (UKR), European silver medalist Yana STADNIK (GBR), and London 2012 silver medalist Maria STADNYK (AZE).

72kg – London 2012 gold medalist Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) won the big titles at Ivan Yarygin, Klippan and the European championships this year, she has also been tripped up in the semifinals of the Russian nationals and the Poland Open.

Although VOROBIEVA will not have to worry about 2011 world silver medalist Ekaterina BUKINA (RUS) in Budapest, reigning world champions Jenny FRANSSON (SWE) and Adeline GRAY (USA), who moves up from 67kg, will be looking to knock off the champ.  Universiade bronze medalist Erica WIEBE (CAN), who edged VOROBIEVA in Poland, 8-1, will also be among the challengers.

Schedule for the Wrestling World Championships

September 16, Monday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: FS 55kg, 66kg, 96kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: FS 55kg, 66kg, 96kg

September 17, Tuesday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: FS 60kg, 84kg, 120kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: FS 60kg, 84kg, 120kg

September 18, Wednesday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: FS 74kg, FW 48kg, 51kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: FS 74kg, FW 48kg, 51kg

September 19, Thursday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: FW 55kg, 59kg, 63kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: FW 55kg, 59kg, 63kg

September 20, Friday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m. Elimination rounds and repechage: FW 67kg, 72kg, GR 55kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m. Finals and awards ceremonies: FW 67kg, 72kg, GR 55kg

September 21, Saturday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: GR 60kg, 84kg, 96kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: GR 60kg, 84kg, 96kg

September 22, Sunday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: GR 66kg, 74kg, 120kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: GR 66kg, 74kg, 120kg

William May conducts the World Rankings for FILA.  He has been active in wrestling across three continents for more than 40 years as a competitor, coach, referee and journalist. William worked as the “Sports Information Specialist” for wrestling at the Beijing 2008 and London 2012 Olympic Games.  He can be reached on his Facebook page or by email, wmay52@hotmail.com.

About FILA

FILA, the International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles, is the global governing body of the sport of wrestling. It works to promote the sport and facilitate the activities of its 177 national federations from around the world. It is based in Corsier-Sur-Vevey, Switzerland.

(For more information please contact FILA at 41.21 312 84 26 or Bob Condron, Press Officer, condron@fila-wrestling.com)  Also see rankings with photos on www.fila-official.com  and

Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/fila.official

LES JAPONAISES GONFLEES A BLOC EN LUTTE LIBRE FEMMES AUX CHAMPIONNATS DU MONDE DE LUTTE

BUDAPEST, HONGRIE, 13 septembre – Il y a un an, les lutteuses japonaises quittaient les Jeux Olympiques de Londres avec trois médailles d’or, pendant que Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) décrochait la quatrième.

Kaori ICHO (JPN) et Saori YOSHIDA (JPN) ont chacune remporté leur troisième médaille d’or olympique et Hitomi OBARA SAKAMOTO (JPN) sa première, soulignant ainsi la domination du Japon en lutte libre femmes au cours du dernier quart de siècle.

Et le pays est sur sa lancée après avoir gagné le vote du CIO le 6 septembre à Buenos Aires, Argentine, préparant ainsi le terrain pour le succès continue des Japonaises sur la scène mondiale en Hongrie.

Cette année, le Japon vient à Budapest avec une jeune équipe prometteuse qui, même avec l’amélioration continue le la lutte libre femmes à travers le monde, est susceptible de quitter l’Arène des Sports Papp Laszlo de Budapest avec plusieurs médailles d’or.

Celles qui mèneront la charge pour le Japon, comme elles le font depuis 2002, sont YOSHIDA et ICHO chez les moins de 55kg et 63kg, respectivement. Le duo japonais luttera lors du deuxième jour de l’évènement féminin, le 19 septembre, avec ICHO disputant sa 8ème ceinture des championnats du monde et YOSHIDA sa 11ème.

Le premier jour des évènements féminins, le 18 septembre, pourrait être complètement Nord Américain avec Alyssa LAMPE (USA) et la championne en titre Jessica MacDONALD (CAN), les favorites chez les moins de 48kg et 51kg. La médaillée d’argent mondiale Eri TOSAKA (JPN) et la championne du monde junior Yu MIYAHARA, compteront parmi les lutteuses.

Même avec YOSHIDA et ICHO sur le tapis le deuxième jour, les yeux seront rivés sur Marianna SASTIN (HUN), qui tente sa chance pour devenir la première Hongroise à décrocher le titre de championne du monde en lutte féminine. Sa rivale principale, Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE), est susceptible de définir si la favorite locale sera couronnée de succès ou non.

Le dernier jour des évènements féminins, partagé avec la lutte greco-romaine, fera figurer la championne olympique Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) chez les moins de 72kg et sa meilleure amie, la prise du lever de pompier.

Pendant ce temps, les moins de 67kg pourrait est la catégorie la plus imprévisible des championnats avec la deux fois championne du monde junior Dorothy YEATS (CAN) parmi les favorites et Sara DOSHO (JPN), qui espère devenir la seule et unique Japonaise à remporter un titre mondiale chez les moins de 67kg.

Pour les fans de statistiques, le Japon a couronné quatre championnes au derniers championnats du monde tenus à Budapest en 2005. Une année plus tard à Guangzhou, le Japon avait cinq championnes, six finalistes et une médaille pour chacune des sept catégories de poids.

La plus grande récolte de médailles d’or du Japon date de 1994, quand, mené par les lutteuses nominées au Hall of Fame Shoko YOSHIMURA (JPN) et Yayoi URANO (JPN), le Japon a remporté six des neufs catégories de poids.

La seule fois où le japon est reparti sans championne du monde date des premiers Championnats du Monde Féminins en 1987. Et les Japonais ont été tenus à une seule championne du monde deux  fois – en 1997 et l’an dernier au Comté de Strathcona.

Brefs aperçus de chaque catégorie de poids :

-48kg – Alyssa LAMPE (USA), médaillée de bronze chez les moins de 51kg l’an dernier, a pris le contrôle de la catégorie de poids senior la plus légère avec une victoire face à Elena VOSTRIKOVA

(RUS) au Grand Prix d’Espagne en juillet. Elle a poursuivi, un mois plus tard, avec une performance tout aussi convaincante à l’Open de Pologne.

Eri TOSAKA (JPN), les médaillée d’argent mondiale l’an dernier, a fait irruption dans le domaine à l’Universiade grâce à une prise technique contre la championne d’Europe Valeria CHEPSARAKOVA (RUS) et finissant avec une autre technique contre la championne d’Europe junior Patimat BAGOMEDOVA (AZE).

Tatyana AMANZHOL-BAKATYUK (KAZ) était la mieux classée chez les moins de 51kg pour juin et juillet, mais a récemment chuté à 48kg. Le style peu orthodoxe de la championne d’Asie pourrait poser problème chez les moins de 48kg ou 51kg, où qu’elle décide d’aller.

-51kg – Yu MIYAHARA (JPN) cherche à devenir la première Japonaise à gagner un titre mondial senior chez les moins de 51kg depuis 2008, quand Hitomi SAKAMOTO a gagné à Tokyo. MIYAHARA a remporté une médaille d’or aux Jeux Olympiques de la jeunesse en 2010, un titre mondial cadet en 2011 et la couronne mondiale junior le mois dernier à Sofia.

La championne en titre Jessica MacDONALD (CAN) a accablé MIYAHARA de sa première défaite en dehors du Japon cette année à la Coupe du Monde en mars. Cependant, plus récemment, MacDONALD a perdu face à la championne d’Europe Roksana ZASINA (POL).

Gardez également l’oeil sur la championne d’Asie SUN Yanan (CHN), médaillée d’argent derrière MacDONALD en 2012, et qui cherche à passer à la dernière étape du podium.

-55kg – Saori YOSHIDA lutte maintenant pour le livre des records – cherchant sont 11ème titre mondial d’affilée et, en passant, peut-être une quatrième médaille d’or olympique. YOSHIDA a une série de 168 victoires d’affilée en tournoi, avec ses deux uniques défaites au niveau international durant la Coupe du Monde.

Sofia MATTSSON (SWE), la championne du monde de 2009 chez les moins de 51kg, a remporté cinq titres cette année, dont la couronne d’Europe. Valeria KOBLOVA-ZHOLOBOVA (RUS) a montré qu’elle a le style pour vaincre YOSHIDA, avec une victoire à la Coupe du Monde de l’an dernier. Helen MAROULIS (USA), la finaliste mondiale de 2012, a vaincu l’une des meilleures compétitrices à Kiev en février, mais a perdu face à MATTSSON en juillet.

-59kg – En 2005, Marianna SASTIN (HUN) avait la foule de Budapest à ses pied en tant que première Hongroise en finale d’un championnat du monde. Cette année, la deux fois médaillée d’argent mondiale va tenter de devenir la toute première femme du pays d’accueil à remporter le titre de championne du monde.

La médaillée de bronze olympique et championne du monde en 2009, Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE) est susceptible d’être l’obstacle le plus important de SASTIN, bien que SASTIN ait vaincu sa rivale principale à l’Open de Pologne.

Braxton STONE (CAN) a remporté deux titres senior cet été et Petra OLLI (FIN) a gagné la prestigieuse couronne de l’Open de Klippan.

-63kg – Kaori ICHO (JPN) détient sept titres mondiaux avec ses trois médailles d’or olympiques et seulement une défaite en dix ans – un forfait pour des raisons médicales face à HOU Min-wen (TPE) dans le premier round des championnats d’Asie de 2007.À l’exception de ce forfait, ICHO a remporté 156 victoires d’affilée depuis l’Open de Klippan en 2003.

La championne du monde, Elena PIROZHKOVA (USA), est la première lutteuse non japonaise à gagner chez les moins de 63kg depuis que le système actuel des poids a été installé en 2002. Avec PIROZHKOVA, trois anciennes championnes du monde – Battetseg SORONZOBOLD (MGL, 59kg), Ganna VASILENKO (UKR, 59kg) et XILUO ZHUOMA (CHN, 67kg) – seront également à l’affût pour renverser ICHO.

-67kg – Nasanburmaa OCHIRBAT (MGL) a dominé les classements tout l’été avec des victoires au Iva Yarygin an janvier et les championnats d’Asie en avril. Mais, la lutteuse à suivre ici peut être la deux fois championne du monde junior Dorothy YEATS (CAN), qui était également médaillée d’argent mondiale senior en 2012.

L’ancienne championne du monde junior, Sara DOSHO (JPN), tentant pour la première fois sa chance aux seniors, a tenu bon pour une victoire à 4-3 face à OCHIRBAT aux finales de l’Universiade, mais elle a souffert d’une défaite unilatérale face à YEATS à 2-0 (7-1, 6-3), durant les demie-finales de la rencontre mondiale junior de l’an dernier.

Du côté de l’intérêt humain, la championne d’Europe Alina STADNIK-MAKHINYA (UKR) est la toute nouvelle membre de la famille de lutteurs Stadnik, qui inclut le médaillé d’argent à Pékin en 2008 Andriy STADNIK (UKR), Andrey STADNIK (UKR), la médaillée d’argent d’Europe Yana STADNIK (GBR), et la médaillée d’argent à Londres en 2012 Maria STADNYK (AZE).

-72kg – La médaillée d’or à Londres en 2012, Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS), à remporté les gros titres au Iva Yarygin, à Klippan et aux championnats d’Europe cette année, elle a également été désarçonnée durant les demie-finales des nationaux Russes et de l’Open de Pologne.

Bien que VOROBIEVA n’aura pas à s’inquiéter de la médaillée d’argent mondiale en 2011 Ekaterina BUKINA (RUS) à Budapest, les championnes du monde Jenny FRANSSON (SWE) et Adeline GRAY (USA), qui passe de la catégorie moins de 67kg à moins de 72kg, tentera de battre la championne. La médaillée de bronze de l’Universiade, Erica WIEBE (CAN), qui a devancé VOROBIEVA en Pologne à 8-1, comptera également parmi les compétitrices.

Schedule for the Wrestling World Championships

September 16, Monday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: FS 55kg, 66kg, 96kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: FS 55kg, 66kg, 96kg

September 17, Tuesday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: FS 60kg, 84kg, 120kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: FS 60kg, 84kg, 120kg

September 18, Wednesday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: FS 74kg, FW 48kg, 51kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: FS 74kg, FW 48kg, 51k

September 19, Thursday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: FW 55kg, 59kg, 63kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: FW 55kg, 59kg, 63kg

September 20, Friday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m. Elimination rounds and repechage: FW 67kg, 72kg, GR 55kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m. Finals and awards ceremonies: FW 67kg, 72kg, GR 55kg

September 21, Saturday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: GR 60kg, 84kg, 96kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: GR 60kg, 84kg, 96kg

September 22, Sunday
1 p.m. – 6 p.m.  Elimination rounds and repechage: GR 66kg, 74kg, 120kg
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.  Finals and awards ceremonies: GR 66kg, 74kg, 120kg

William May est chargé d’établir les classements mondiaux de la FILA. Il travaille dans l’univers de la lutte sur trois continents, depuis plus de 40 ans, tour à tour comme compétiteur, coach, arbitre et journaliste. William a travaillé comme « expert sportif » pour la lutte aux Jeux olympiques de Pékin en 2008 et de Londres en 2012. N’hésitez pas à le contacter via sa page Facebook ou par mail : wmay52@hotmail.com.

A propos de la FILA :

La FILA, Fédération Internationale de Lutte Associées, est l’organisme de référence pour la lutte sportive. Elle travaille à promouvoir ce sport et à aider le développement des activités des 177 fédérations nationales à travers le monde. Son siège se trouve à Vevey en Suisse.

Pour en savoir plus sur la campagne menée par la FILA pour conserver la lutte aux Jeux Olympiques, vous pouvez visiter le site officiel de la Fédération, http://www.fila-official.com/; sa page Facebook,  http://www.facebook.com/fila.official, ou son profil twitter,  @FILA_Official.

(Pour plus d’informations sur la FILA, appelez le 41.21 312 84 26  ou contactez Bob Condron, attaché de presse, condron@fila-wrestling.com

Japan Tops 3 Weights in FILA Rankings Before World Championships

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY (September 18) – Japanese wrestlers lead the FILA World Rankings for women in three weight categories as the top female wrestlers turn their attention to Wrestling World Championships.

Three-time Olympic Games gold medal winners Saori YOSHIDA (JPN) and Kaori ICHO (JPN) have cast their long shadows over the rankings all summer at 55kg and 63kg.  They are now joined by national team newcomer Yu MIYAHARA, fresh from her triumph at 51kg at the junior world championships.

MIYAHARA, also a world cadet and Youth Olympics gold medalist, moved to the top of the rankings at 51kg with some help from European champion Roksana ZASINA (POL), who bumped off top-ranked Jessica MacDONALD (CAN) in the finals of the Poland Open.

Meanwhile, London 2012 gold medalist Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) has been challenged at home and abroad, but her five tournament victories, including the European championship, have kept her on top of the rankings.

Russian wrestlers also had early control of the 48kg rankings, but world bronze medalist Alyssa LAMPE (USA) has taken over with wins in Madrid and Spala while Universiade champion Eri TOSAKA (JPN) has moved into second.

Marianna SASTIN (HUN), meanwhile, took over the top spot at 59kg with a win in Poland over Olympic bronze medalist Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE), giving the hosts of the world championships in Budapest a top-ranked wrestler to cheer for in women’s frestyle.

At 67kg, Asia champion Nasanburmaa OCHIRBAT (MGL) has been the leader all summer despite her hard-fought loss to Sara DOSHO (JPN) in the Universiade finals.

The rankings are listed by the wrestler’s name, country code, most recent or most significant result of the year, and the wrestler’s ranking the previous month.

48kg – Alyssa LAMPE (USA) won five bouts by fall or technical fall to claim her third title of the year at the Poland Open, defeating former No.1 at 51kg Tatyana AMANZHOL-BAKATYUK (KAZ) in the final.

Formerly top-ranked Elena VOSTRIKOVA (RUS) slumped to 12th place in Spala after a 5-4 loss to Victoria ANTHONY (USA) in the round of 16, allowing last year’s world silver medal winner Eri TOSAKA (JPN) to sneak into the No.2 position.

  1. Alyssa LAMPE (USA) – Poland Open No.1 (1)
  2. Eri TOSAKA (JPN) – Universiade No.1 (4)
  3. Elena VOSTRIKOVA (RUS) – Grand Prix of Spain No.3 (2)
  4. Valeria CHEPSARAKOVA (RUS) – Universiade No.3 (3)
  5. Patimat BAGOMEDOVA (AZE) – Universiade No.2 (6)
  6. Victoria ANTHONY (USA) – Austrian Open No.1 (9)
  7. Jacquelin SCHELLIN (GER) – German GP No.3 (11)
  8. Silvia FELICE (ITA), Mediterranean Games No.1 (12)
  9. Yana STADNIK (GBR) – GGP Sassari No.1 (5)
  10. Enkhjargal TSOGTBAZAR (MGL) – Poland Open No.3 (not ranked)
  11. Mayelis CARIPA CASTILLO (VEN) – GP of Spain No.2 (7)
  12. Suemeyya SEZER (TUR) – Mediterranean Games No.2 (12)
  13. Narangerel ERDENESUKH (MGL) – Universiade No.5 (8)
  14. PAK, Yong-Mi (PRK) – Asia No.1 (10)
  15. Thalia MALLQUI PECHE (PER) – Pan America No.1 (15)

51kg – European champion Roksana ZASINA (POL) scored five points in the second period of her Poland Open final with top-ranked Jessica MacDONALD (CAN) to win, 6-1, and claim the No.2 position behind new No.1, Yu MIYAHARA (JPN).

MIYAHARA, who won the Klippan Ladies crown in February, is fresh off a triumph at the junior world championships in Sofia and is now looking forward to her first senior world meet.

MIYAHARA’s only loss in international competition this year was to MacDONALD at the World Cup in March – on a third-period clinch.

  1. Yu MIYAHARA (JPN) – Klippan Ladies No.1 (2)
  2. Roksana ZASINA (POL) – Poland Open No.1 (5)
  3. Jessica MacDONALD (CAN) – GP of Spain No.1 (1)
  4. Ekaterina KRASNOVA (RUS) – Universiade No.3 (4)
  5. Tatyana AMANZHOL-BAKATYUK (KAZ) – GGP Sassari No.1 (3)
  6. Kristina YALOVENKO (KAZ) – German GP No.1 (6)
  7. Burcu KEBIC (TUR) – Mediterranean Games No.2 (7)
  8. Melanie LeSAFFRE (FRA) – Mediterranean Games No.1 (8)
  9. Yulia BLAHINYA (UKR) – Universiade No.3 (9)
  10. Natalya MALYSHEVA (RUS) – Poland Open No.3 (nr)
  11. Marina VILMOVA (RUS) – GP of Spain No.2 (12)
  12. Whitney CONDER (USA) – Austrian Open No. 1 (10)
  13. Patricia BERMUDEZ (ARG) – South America No.1 (11)
  14. Isabelle SAMBOU (SEN) – GP of Spain No.3 (13)
  15. Angela DOROGAN (AZE) – Universiade No.5 (14)

55kg – Sofia MATTSSON (SWE) won her fifth event in a row at the Poland Open and Emese BARKA (HUN) made her sixth trip to the medals podium in 2013 to collect the silver.

German Grand Prix winner Jill GALLAYS (CAN) and local favorite Katarzyna KRAWCZYK (POL) received the bronze medals as each earned a place in the FILA World Rankings for the first time.

  1. Saori YOSHIDA (JPN) – OG 3x No.1, World 10x No.1 (1)
  2. Sofia MATTSSON (SWE) – Poland Open No.1 (2)
  3. Helen MAROULIS (USA) – GP of Spain No.2 (3)
  4. Valeria KOBLOVA-ZHOLOBOVA (RUS) – Universiade No.1 (4)
  5. Irina HUSYAK (UKR) – Universaide No.2 (5)
  6. Emese BARKA (HUN) – Poland Open No.2 (8)
  7. Jill GALLAYS (CAN) – Poland Open No.3 (nr)
  8. Kanako MURATA (JPN) – Universiade No.3 (6)
  9. Byambatseren SUNDEV (MGL) – GP of Spain No.3 (7)
  10. Katarzyna KRAWCZYK (POL) – Poland Open No.3 (nr)
  11. Ana Maria PAVAL (ROU) – Ion Corneanu Memorial No.1 (13)
  12. Orkhon PUREVDORJ (MGL) – Universiade No.5 (9)
  13. Sarah HILDEBRANDT (USA) – Austrian Open No.1 (10)
  14. Marwa AMRI (TUN) – Mediterranean Games No.2 (15)
  15. Aurelie BASSET (FRA) – Austrian Open No.2 (nr)

59kg – Two-time world silver medalist Marianna SASTIN (HUN) and Olympic bronze medalist Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE) met in a prelude to the world championships with Sastin taking a 5-2 decision on her way to the Poland Open title.

Braxton STONE (CAN) lost in the finals of the junior world championships after winning two senior events in Germany and Spain, but moved up to No.3 in the rankings. Junior bronze medalists Aisuluu TYNYBEKOVA (KGZ) and Petra OLLI (FIN) join STONE in the senior rankings.

  1. Marianna SASTIN (HUN) – Poland Open No.1 (2)
  2. Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE) – Universiade No.1 (1)
  3. Braxton STONE (CAN) – GP of Spain No.1 (4)
  4. Anastassia HUCHOK (BLR) – GP of Spain No.2 (6/63)
  5. Aisuluu TYNYBEKOVA (KGZ) – Universiade No.3 (7)
  6. Allison RAGAN (USA) – Universiade No.2 (6)
  7. Zhargalma TSYRENOVA (RUS) – Universiade No.5 (5)
  8. Petra OLLI (FIN) – Klippan Ladies No.1 (11)
  9. Tungalag MUNKHTUYA (MGL) – Mongolian Open No.1 (8)
  10. Anna ZWIRYDOWSKA (POL) – Poland Open No.3 (nr)
  11. Michelle FAZZARI (CAN) – Austrian Open No.2 (10)
  12. Hafize SAHIN (TUR) – Mediterranean Games No.1 (12)
  13. Joice SOUZA DE SILVA (BRA) – Pan America No.2 (13)
  14. Hela RIABI (TUN) – Poland Open No.7 (nr)
  15. Ayaka ITO (JPN) – Universiade No.5 (14)

63kg – Universiade bronze medalist Maria MAMASHUK (BLR) stopped hometown favorite Monika MICHALIK (POL), 3-0, in the finals of the Poland Open to make her first appearance on the FILA World Rankings at No.6.

World silver medalist at 63kg Taybe YUSEIN (BUL) took second in the Poland Open at 59kg to edge onto the 63kg rankings at No.15.  YUSEIN, the 2011 junior world champion at 63kg, is entered at 59kg for the senior world championships in Budapest.

  1. Kaori ICHO (JPN) – OG 3x No.1, World 7x No.1 (1)
  2. Elena PIROZHKOVA (USA) – GP of Spain No.1 (2)
  3. Battsetseg SORONZOBOLD (MGL) – Universiade No.1 (3)
  4. Anastasija GRIGORJEVA (LAT) – Europe No.1 (4)
  5. Jackeline RENTARIA CASTILLO (COL) – South America No.1 (5)
  6. Maria MAMASHUK (BLR) – Poland Open No.1 (nr)
  7. Inna TRAZHUKOVA (RUS) – Klippan Ladies No.1 (13)
  8. Irina NETREBA (AZE) – Universiade No.3 (3/59)
  9. Justine BOUCHARD (CAN) – German GP No.3 (8)
  10. XILUO Zhuoma (CHN) – Asia No.1 (7)
  11. Monika MICHALIK (POL) – Poland Open No.2 (12)
  12. Hanna BELYAEVA (AZE) – Austrian Open No.1 (9)
  13. Henna JOHANSSON (SWE) – GP of Spain No.3 (10)
  14. Elif Jale YESILIRMAK (TUR) – Mediterranean Games No.1 (11)
  15. Taybe YUSEIN (BUL) – Poland Open No.2/59kg (nr)

67kg – Dorothy YEATS (CAN) won her second junior world title in Sofia to break into the rankings at No.8 while junior world runner-up Dzhnan MANOLOVA (BUL) edges up one rung to No.12.

Grand Prix of Spain winner Aline FOCKEN (GER) also moved up a notch with a bronze medal at the Poland Open while Elina VASEVA (BUL) made a move from No.14 to No.10 with the other bronze medal.

  1. Nasanburmaa OCHIRBAT (MGL) – Universiade No.2 (1)
  2. Alina STADNIK-MAKHINYA (UKR) – Universiade No.3 (2)
  3. Ilana KRATYSH (ISR) – GGP Sassari No.1 (3)
  4. Stacie ANAKA (CAN) – Universiade No.3 (4)
  5. Natalya PALAMARCHUK (AZE) – Austrian Open No.1 (5)
  6. Sara DOSHO (JPN) – Universiade No.1 (6)
  7. Aline FOCKEN (GER) – GP of Spain No.1 (8)
  8. Dorothy YEATS (CAN) – GP of Spain No.3 (nr)
  9. Svetlana BABUSHKINA (RUS) – German GP No.2 (7)
  10. Elina VASEVA (BUL) – Poland Open No.3 (14)
  11. Veronica CARLSON (USA) – Universiade No.5 (9)
  12. Dzhanan MANOLOVA (BUL) – Ion Corneanu No.1 (13)
  13. Yulia BARTNOVSKAYA (RUS) – German GP No.3 (10)
  14. Kitti GODO (HUN) – GGP Sassari No.2 (15)
  15. Martina KUENZ (AUT) – Austrian Open No.3 (12)

72kg – Universiade bronze medalist Erica WEIBE (CAN) defeated Olympic champion Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS), 8-7, in the semifinals and then overcame Olympic bronze medalist Gouzel MANYUROVA (KAZ), 8-8 on criteria, in the finals to claim the Poland Open title.

WEIBE breaks into the rankings at No.5 while MANYUROVA, missing in action since winning the silver medal at the women’s world championships 11 months ago, joins the rankings at No.11.

  1. Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) – GP of Spain No.1 (1)
  2. Vasilisa MARZALIUK (BLR) – GP of Spain No.2 (2)
  3. Jenny FRANSSON (SWE) – GGP Sassari No.1 (3)
  4. Ekaterina BUKINA (RUS) – Universiade No.1 (4)
  5. Erica WIEBE (CAN) – Poland Open No.1 (nr)
  6. Burmaa OCHIRBAT (MGL), GP of Spain No.3 (5)
  7. Adeline GRAY (USA) – GP of Spain No.3 (8)
  8. Hiroe SUZUKI (JPN) – Asia No. 1 (7)
  9. Svetlana SAENKO (MDA) – Ion Corneanu No.1 (9)
  10. Maider UNDA (ESP) – Europe No.2 (6)
  11. Gouzel MANYUROVA (KAZ) – Poland Open No.2 (nr)
  12. Odonchimeg BADRAKH (MGL) – Poland Open No.3 (nr)
  13. Marina GASTL (AUT) – Austrian Open No.1 (11)
  14. Yasemin ADAR (TUR) – Mediterranean Games No. 1 (13)
  15. Katerina BURMISTROVA (UKR) – Int’l Ukrainian No.1 (10)

William May conducts the World Rankings for FILA.  He has been active in wrestling across three continents for more than 40 years as a competitor, coach, referee and journalist. William worked as the “Sports Information Specialist” for wrestling at the Beijing 2008 and London 2012 Olympic Games.  He can be reached on his Facebook page or by email, wmay52@hotmail.com.

About FILA

FILA, the International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles, is the global governing body of the sport of wrestling. It works to promote the sport and facilitate the activities of its 177 national federations from around the world. It is based in Corsier-Sur-Vevey, Switzerland.

(For more information please contact FILA at 41.21 312 84 26 or Bob Condron, Press Officer, condron@fila-wrestling.com)  Also see rankings with photos on www.fila-official.com and

Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/fila.official

Français

CLASSEMENTS MONDIAUX DE LA FILA

LE JAPON EN TETE DANS 3 CATEGORIES DE POIDS DANS LES CLASSEMENTS DE LA FILA AVANT LES CHAMPIONNATS DU MONDE

BUDAPEST, HONGRIE, 13 Septembre – Les lutteuses japonaises dominent les Classements Mondiaux de la FILA dans trois catégories de poids alors que l’attention des meilleures lutteuses se tourne vers les Championnats du Monde de Lutte.

Les trois fois médaillées d’or des Jeux Olympiques  Saori YOSHIDA (JPN) et Kaori ICHO (JPN) ont eu une influence considérable sur les classements tout l’été chez les moins de 55 et 63kg. Elles sont maintenant rejointes par une nouvelle venue dans l’équipe nationale, Yu MIYAHARA, grâce à son triomphe chez les moins de 51kg aux championnats du monde junior.

MIYAHARA, également mondiale cadet et médaillée d’or des JO de la jeunesse, s’est hissée au sommet du classement chez les moins de 51kg, avec l’aide de la championne d’Europe Roksana ZASINA (POL), qui a liquidé la meilleure du classement Jessica MacDONALD(CAN) durant la finale de l’Open de Pologne.

Pendant ce temps, la médaillée d’or à Londres en 2012, Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) a été défiée chez elle et à l’étranger, mais ses cinq victoires, dont le championnat d’Europe, lui a permis de conserver sa place au sommet du classement.

Les lutteuses russes contrôlaient également au début le classement des moins de 48kg, mais la médaillée de bronze mondiale Alyssa LAMPE (USA) a pris le dessus avec des victoires à Madrid et Spala, alors que la championne de l’Universiade Eri TOSAKA (JPN) s’est placée seconde.

Marianna SASTIN (HUN), pendant ce temps, a pris la première place chez les moins de 59kg avec une victoire en Pologne face à la médaillée de bronze olympique Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE), donnant à la foule des championnats du monde à Budapest une lutteuse au top du classement à acclamer pour la lutte libre femmes.

Chez les moins de 67kg, la championne d’Asie Nasanburmaa OCHIRBAT (MGL) a été la leadeuse tout l’été malgré sa défaite difficile face à Sara DOSHO (JPN) durant la finale de l’Universiade.

Les classements sont établis par noms, code CIO des pays, résultats les plus récents ou les plus notables de la saison, et classements du mois dernier.

-48kg – Alyssa LAMPE (USA) a gagné cinq combats par prise ou prise technique pour remporter son troisième titre de l’année à l’Open de Pologne, en battant l’ancienne No.1 chez les moins de 51kg Tatyana AMANZHOL-BAKATYUK (KAZ) en finale.

Autrefois en tête du classement, Elena VOSTRIKOVA (RUS) a chuté à la douzième place à Spala après une défaite à 5-4 contre Victoria ANTHONY (USA) durant les 16èmes de finales, permettant ainsi à la médaillée d’argent mondiale de l’an dernier, Eri TOSAKA (JPN) de se faufiler à la 2ème position.

  1. Alyssa LAMPE (USA) – Open de Pologne No.1 (1)
  2. Eri TOSAKA (JPN) – Universiade No.1 (4)
  3. Elena VOSTRIKOVA (RUS) – Grand Prix d’Espagne No.3 (2)
  4. Valeria CHEPSARAKOVA (RUS) – Universiade No.3 (3)
  5. Patimat BAGOMEDOVA (AZE) – Universiade No.2 (6)
  6. Victoria ANTHONY (USA) – Open d’Autriche Open No.1 (9)
  7. Jacquelin SCHELLIN (GER) – Grand Prix d’Allemagne No.3 (11)
  8. Silvia FELICE (ITA), Jeux Mediterranéens No.1 (12)
  9. Yana STADNIK (GBR) – Golden Grand Prix Sassari No.1 (5)
  10. Enkhjargal TSOGTBAZAR (MGL) – Open de Pologne No.3 (non classé)
  11. Mayelis CARIPA CASTILLO (VEN) – GP d’Espagne No.2 (7)
  12. Suemeyya SEZER (TUR) – Jeux Mediterranéens No.2 (12)
  13. Narangerel ERDENESUKH (MGL) – Universiade No.5 (8)
  14. PAK, Yong-Mi (PRK) – Asie No.1 (10)
  15. Thalia MALLQUI PECHE (PER) – Pan America No.1 (15)

-51kg – La championne d’Europe Roksana ZASINA (POL) a marqué cinq points à la seconde période de sa finale à l’Open de Pologne avec la mieux classée Jessica MacDONALD (CAN) pour gagner à 6-1 et se hisser à la 2ème position derrière la nouvelle No.1, Yu MIYAHARA (JPN).

MIYAHARA, qui a gagné la couronne du Klippan Ladies en février, a triomphé aux championnats du monde junior à Sofia et se réjouit maintenant de sa première rencontre mondiale senior.

La seule défaite de MIYAHARA en compétition au niveau international cette année était face à MacDONALD à la Coupe du Monde en Mars – avec une soumission à la troisième période.

  1. Yu MIYAHARA (JPN) – Klippan Ladies No.1 (2)
  2. Roksana ZASINA (POL) – Open de Pologne No.1 (5)
  3. Jessica MacDONALD (CAN) – GP d’Espagne No.1 (1)
  4. Ekaterina KRASNOVA (RUS) – Universiade No.3 (4)
  5. Tatyana AMANZHOL-BAKATYUK (KAZ) – GGP Sassari No.1 (3)
  6. Kristina YALOVENKO (KAZ) – GP d’Allemagne No.1 (6)
  7. Burcu KEBIC (TUR) – Mediterranean Games No.2 (7)
  8. Melanie LeSAFFRE (FRA) – Mediterranean Games No.1 (8)
  9. Yulia BLAHINYA (UKR) – Universiade No.3 (9)
  10. Natalya MALYSHEVA (RUS) – Open de Pologne No.3 (nc)
  11. Marina VILMOVA (RUS) – GP d’Espagne No.2 (12)
  12. Whitney CONDER (USA) – Open d’Autriche No. 1 (10)
  13. Patricia BERMUDEZ (ARG) – Amérique du Sud No.1 (11)
  14. Isabelle SAMBOU (SEN) – GP d’Espagne No.3 (13)
  15. Angela DOROGAN (AZE) – Universiade No.5 (14)

-55kg – Sofia MATTSSON (SWE) a gagné son cinquième évènement d’affilée à l’Open de Pologne et Emese BARKA (HUN) a fait son sixième voyage vers le podium en 2013 pour la médaille d’argent.

German Grand Prix winner La gagnante du Grand Pris d’Allemagne, Jill GALLAYS (CAN), et la favorite locale Katarzyna KRAWCZYK (POL) ont été médaillées de bronze et obtenu chacune une place dans les Classements Mondiaux de FILA pour la première fois.

  1. Saori YOSHIDA (JPN) – OG 3x No.1, World 10x No.1 (1)
  2. Sofia MATTSSON (SWE) – Open de Pologne No.1 (2)
  3. Helen MAROULIS (USA) – GP d’EspagneNo.2 (3)
  4. Valeria KOBLOVA-ZHOLOBOVA (RUS) – Universiade No.1 (4)
  5. Irina HUSYAK (UKR) – Universaide No.2 (5)
  6. Emese BARKA (HUN) – Open de Pologne No.2 (8)
  7. Jill GALLAYS (CAN) – Open de Pologne No.3 (nc)
  8. Kanako MURATA (JPN) – Universiade No.3 (6)
  9. Byambatseren SUNDEV (MGL) – GP d’Espagne No.3 (7)
  10. Katarzyna KRAWCZYK (POL) – Open de Pologne No.3 (nc)
  11. Ana Maria PAVAL (ROU) – Ion Corneanu Memorial No.1 (13)
  12. Orkhon PUREVDORJ (MGL) – Universiade No.5 (9)
  13. Sarah HILDEBRANDT (USA) – Open d’AutricheNo.1 (10)
  14. Marwa AMRI (TUN) – Jeux Mediterranéens No.2 (15)
  15. Aurelie BASSET (FRA) – Open d’Autriche No.2 (nc)

59kg – La deux fois médaillée d’argent mondiale Marianna SASTIN (HUN) et la médaillée de bronze olympique Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE) se sont rencontrées durant un prélude des championnats du monde, Sastin gagnant à 5-2 avant de décrocher le titre de l’Open de Pologne.

Braxton STONE (CAN) a perdu la finale des championnats du monde junior après avoir gagné deux évènements senior en Allemagne et en Espagne, mais elle est montée à la 3ème place du classement. Les médaillées de bronze juniors TYNYBEKOVA (KGZ) et Petra OLLI (FIN) rejoignent STONE dans le classement senior.

  1. Marianna SASTIN (HUN) – Open de Pologne No.1 (2)
  2. Yulia RATKEVICH (AZE) – Universiade No.1 (1)
  3. Braxton STONE (CAN) – GP d’Espagne No.1 (4)
  4. Anastassia HUCHOK (BLR) – GP d’Espagne No.2 (6/63)
  5. Aisuluu TYNYBEKOVA (KGZ) – Universiade No.3 (7)
  6. Allison RAGAN (USA) – Universiade No.2 (6)
  7. Zhargalma TSYRENOVA (RUS) – Universiade No.5 (5)
  8. Petra OLLI (FIN) – Klippan Ladies No.1 (11)
  9. Tungalag MUNKHTUYA (MGL) – Mongolian Open No.1 (8)
  10. Anna ZWIRYDOWSKA (POL) – Open de Pologne No.3 (nc)
  11. Michelle FAZZARI (CAN) – Open d’Autriche No.2 (10)
  12. Hafize SAHIN (TUR) – Jeux Mediterranéens No.1 (12)
  13. Joice SOUZA DE SILVA (BRA) – Pan America No.2 (13)
  14. Hela RIABI (TUN) – Open de Pologne No.7 (nc)
  15. Ayaka ITO (JPN) – Universiade No.5 (14)

63kg – La médaillée de bronze de l’Universiade Maria MAMASHUK (BLR) a stoppé la favorite locale Monika MICHALIK (POL), à 3-0, durant la finale de l’Open de Pologne pour faire sa première apparition dans les Classements Mondiaux de la FILA à la 6ème place.

La médaillée d’argent mondiale chez les 63kg, Taybe YUSEIN (BUL), est arrivée seconde à l’Open de Pologne chez les moins de 59kg pour entrer dans le classement des moins de 63kg à la 15ème position. YUSEIN, la championne du monde junior en 2011 chez les moins de 63kg, est entrée chez les moins de 59kg pour les championnats d’Europe senior à Budapest.

  1. Kaori ICHO (JPN) – OG 3x No.1, World 7x No.1 (1)
  2. Elena PIROZHKOVA (USA) – GP d’Espagne No.1 (2)
  3. Battsetseg SORONZOBOLD (MGL) – Universiade No.1 (3)
  4. Anastasija GRIGORJEVA (LAT) – Europe No.1 (4)
  5. Jackeline RENTARIA CASTILLO (COL) – Amérique du Sud No.1 (5)
  6. Maria MAMASHUK (BLR) – Open de Pologne No.1 (nc)
  7. Inna TRAZHUKOVA (RUS) – Klippan Ladies No.1 (13)
  8. Irina NETREBA (AZE) – Universiade No.3 (3/59)
  9. Justine BOUCHARD (CAN) – GP d’Allemagne No.3 (8)
  10. XILUO Zhuoma (CHN) – Asie No.1 (7)
  11. Monika MICHALIK (POL) – Open de Pologne No.2 (12)
  12. Hanna BELYAEVA (AZE) – Open d’Autriche No.1 (9)
  13. Henna JOHANSSON (SWE) – GP d’Espagne No.3 (10)
  14. Elif Jale YESILIRMAK (TUR) – Jeux Mediterranéens No.1 (11)
  15. Taybe YUSEIN (BUL) – Open de Pologne No.2/59kg (nc)

67kg – Dorothy YEATS (CAN) a gagné son second titre mondial junior à Sofia pour entrer dans le classement à la 8ème place pendant que la finaliste mondiale junior Dzhnan MANOLOVA (BUL) monte d’un cran à la 12ème position.

La gagnante du Grand Prix d’Espagne, Aline FOCKEN (GER), a également grimpé dans le classement avec une médaille de bronze à l’Open de Pologne pendant qu’Elina VASEVA (BUL) est passée de la 14ème à la 10ème avec l’autre médaille de bronze.

  1. Nasanburmaa OCHIRBAT (MGL) – Universiade No.2 (1)
  2. Alina STADNIK-MAKHINYA (UKR) – Universiade No.3 (2)
  3. Ilana KRATYSH (ISR) – GGP Sassari No.1 (3)
  4. Stacie ANAKA (CAN) – Universiade No.3 (4)
  5. Natalya PALAMARCHUK (AZE) – Open d’Autriche No.1 (5)
  6. Sara DOSHO (JPN) – Universiade No.1 (6)
  7. Aline FOCKEN (GER) – GP d’Espagne No.1 (8)
  8. Dorothy YEATS (CAN) – GP d’Espagne No.3 (nc)
  9. Svetlana BABUSHKINA (RUS) – GP d’Allemagne No.2 (7)
  10. Elina VASEVA (BUL) – Open de Pologne No.3 (14)
  11. Veronica CARLSON (USA) – Universiade No.5 (9)
  12. Dzhanan MANOLOVA (BUL) – Ion Corneanu No.1 (13)
  13. Yulia BARTNOVSKAYA (RUS) – GP d’Allemagne No.3 (10)
  14. Kitti GODO (HUN) – GGP Sassari No.2 (15)
  15. Martina KUENZ (AUT) – Open d’Autriche No.3 (12)

72kg – La médaillée de bronze de l’Universiade Erica WEIBE (CAN) a vaincu la championne olympique Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS), à 8-7, durant les demi-finales, puis a maîtrisé la médaillée de bronze olympqiue Gouzel MANYUROVA (KAZ), à 8-8 sur critère, durant les finales pour remporter le titre de l’Open de Pologne.

WEIBE entre dans le classement à la 5ème position pendant que MANYUROVA, manque à l’appel depuis sa victoire d’argent aux championnats du monde féminins il y a 11 mois, intègre le classement à la 11ème place.

  1. Natalia VOROBIEVA (RUS) – GP d’Espagne No.1 (1)
  2. Vasilisa MARZALIUK (BLR) – GP d’Espagne No.2 (2)
  3. Jenny FRANSSON (SWE) – GGP Sassari No.1 (3)
  4. Ekaterina BUKINA (RUS) – Universiade No.1 (4)
  5. Erica WIEBE (CAN) – Open de Pologne No.1 (nr)
  6. Burmaa OCHIRBAT (MGL), GP d’Espagne No.3 (5)
  7. Adeline GRAY (USA) – GP d’Espagne No.3 (8)
  8. Hiroe SUZUKI (JPN) – Asie No. 1 (7)
  9. Svetlana SAENKO (MDA) – Ion Corneanu No.1 (9)
  10. Maider UNDA (ESP) – Europe No.2 (6)
  11. Gouzel MANYUROVA (KAZ) – Open de Pologne No.2 (nr)
  12. Odonchimeg BADRAKH (MGL) – Open de Pologne No.3 (nr)
  13. Marina GASTL (AUT) – Open d’Autriche No.1 (11)
  14. Yasemin ADAR (TUR) – Jeux Mediterranéens No. 1 (13)
  15. Katerina BURMISTROVA (UKR) – Int’l Ukrainian No.1 (10)

William May est chargé d’établir les classements mondiaux de la FILA. Il travaille dans l’univers de la lutte sur trois continents, depuis plus de 40 ans, tour à tour comme compétiteur, coach, arbitre et journaliste. William a travaillé comme « expert sportif » pour la lutte aux Jeux olympiques de Pékin en 2008 et de Londres en 2012. N’hésitez pas à le contacter via sa page Facebook ou par mail : wmay52@hotmail.com.

A propos de la FILA :

La FILA, Fédération Internationale de Lutte Associées, est l’organisme de référence pour la lutte sportive. Elle travaille à promouvoir ce sport et à aider le développement des activités des 177 fédérations nationales à travers le monde. Son siège se trouve à Vevey en Suisse.

Pour en savoir plus sur la campagne menée par la FILA pour conserver la lutte aux Jeux Olympiques, vous pouvez visiter le site officiel de la Fédération, http://www.fila-official.com/; sa page Facebook,  http://www.facebook.com/fila.official, ou son profil twitter,  @FILA_Official.

(Pour plus d’informations sur la FILA, appelez le 41.21 312 84 26  ou contactez Bob Condron, attaché de presse, condron@fila-wrestling.com